Randall Foods, Inc. of Cincinnati, Ohio is recalling all its Randall-brand beans because of manufacturing deviations that may pose a potential health risk.  The recall includes the following products:

Brand

Description

UPC

Batch/Lot Numbers

“Best By” Date

Randall RANDALL GREAT NORTHERN BEANS 48OZ 070095000100 ALL Prior to January 1 2025
Randall RANDALL GREAT NORTHERN BEANS 24OZ 070095000117 ALL Prior to January 1 2025
Randall
Randall
RANDALL GREAT NORTHERN BEANS 15.4OZ
RANDALL PINTO BEANS 48OZ
070095000131
070095000209
ALL
ALL
Prior to January 1 2025
Prior to January 1 2025
Randall RANDALL PINTO BEANS 24OZ 070095000216 ALL Prior to January 1 2025
Randall RANDALL PINTO BEANS 15.4OZ 070095000230 ALL Prior to January 1 2025
Randall RANDALL MIXED BEANS 48OZ 070095000407 ALL Prior to January 1 2025
Randall RANDALL MIXED BEANS 24OZ 070095000414 ALL Prior to January 1 2025
Randall RANDALL MIXED BEANS 15.4OZ 070095000430 ALL Prior to January 1 2025
Randall RANDALL KIDNEY BEANS 48OZ 070095000308 ALL Prior to January 1 2025
Randall RANDALL KIDNEY BEANS 24OZ 070095000315 ALL Prior to January 1 2025
Randall RANDALL KIDNEY BEANS 15.4OZ 070095000339 ALL Prior to January 1 2025
Randall RANDALL NAVY BEANS 48OZ 070095000506 ALL Prior to January 1 2025
Randall RANDALL NAVY BEANS 15.4OZ 070095000537 ALL Prior to January 1 2025
Randall RANDALL BLACK BEANS 48OZ 070095000605 ALL Prior to January 1 2025
Randall RANDALL BLACK BEANS 24OZ 070095000612 ALL Prior to January 1 2025
Randall RANDALL BLACK BEANS 15.4OZ 070095000636 ALL Prior to January 1 2025
Randall RANDALL GARBANZO BEANS 24OZ 070095000711 ALL Prior to January 1 2025
Randall RANDALL GARBANZO BEANS 15.4OZ 070095000735 ALL Prior to January 1 2025
Randall RANDALL ULITMATE 4-BEAN MIX 48OZ 070095000902 ALL Prior to January 1 2025
Randall RANDALL ORGANIC GREAT NORTHERN BEANS 48OZ 070095005105 ALL Prior to January 1 2025

The product is sold in 48oz, 24oz, and 15.4oz glass jars with tan labels with “Randall” at the label top.    Approximately 1.6 million cases of affected products were distributed between March 1, 2019 and May 15, 2021 at retail locations in the following states: Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Iowa, Illinois, Kansas, Kentucky, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North Carolina, New York, Ohio, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, Virginia, Wisconsin, and West Virginia.

The manufacturing deviations included a nonfunctioning temperature indicating device raising the possibility that the product was not effectively processed. Processing at temperatures below a required temperature could create a condition that could lead to premature spoilage or food borne illness; however, there have been no illnesses reported. The company is issuing this voluntary recall as a precaution.

Faribault Foods, Inc. is voluntarily recalling 15 ounce cans of S&W Organic Black Beans, 15 ounce cans of O Organic Brand Black Beans and 15 ounce cans of O Organic Brand Chili Beans because the cans may have a compromised hermetic seal.  The compromised hermetic seal may affect can integrity and may cause the cans to leak, bloat or allow bacteria to grow inside the product which could lead to serious illness.  Clostridium botulinum poisoning in humans can begin from six hours to two weeks after eating food that contains the toxin. Symptoms may include double vision, blurred vision, drooping eyelids, slurred speech, difficulty swallowing, and muscle weakness. Botulism poisoning can cause paralysis of the breathing muscles, which can result in death unless assistance with breathing (mechanical ventilation) is provided.

The recalled products were distributed nationwide in retail stores.

This event only affects the lot codes listed below:  The lot codes are printed on the bottom of the can.

Product

Lot Number

Distribution Dates

S&W Organic Black Beans, 15 oz. Best By JAN 31 2023  1329A 032 21 February 2021-April 2021
S& W Organic Black Beans, 15 oz. Best By FEB 01 2023 1329A 033 21 February 2021-April 2021
S&W Organic Black Beans, 15 oz. Best By FEB 02 2023 1329A 034 21 February 2021-April 2021
S&W Organic Black Beans, 15 oz. Best By FEB 03 2023 1329A 035 21 February 2021-April 2021
O Organic Organic Black Beans, 15 oz. Best By FEB 03 2023 981A 035 21 February 2021-April 2021
O Organic Organic Chili Beans, 15 oz. Best By FEB 04 2023 978A 036 21 February 2021-April 2021

No other production codes, sizes or brands of Faribault Foods, Inc. products are affected by this recall.

Consumers who may have purchased the products listed above should return them to the store where purchased for a refund or replacement.

The recall was initiated after the firm had received consumer and customer complaints regarding failure of the hermetic seal.  The problem related to the hermetic seal failure was corrected and no other product is affected.

Botulism is a life-threatening paralytic illness caused by neurotoxins produced by an anaerobic, gram-positive, spore-forming bacterium—Clostridium botulinum. 

Foodborne botulism is the type that is typically associated with classic botulism symptoms; it is caused by eating foods or ingesting substances that contain botulinum toxin. In foodborne botulism, it is the pre-formed toxin that causes illness, not the bacterium itself. The incidence of foodborne botulism is extremely low, usually fewer than 25 cases per year in the United States. Nonetheless, the extreme risk to public health posed by the toxin requires  that “intensive surveillance is maintained for botulism cases in the United States, and every case is treated as a public health emergency.” Botulism poisoning carries a mortality rate of up to 65% when victims are not treated immediately and properly. Medical treatment is supportive (including mechanical ventilation if required), and an antitoxin may be given to bind free toxin and reverse or delay the progression of symptoms, when used early in the course of illness. Most foodborne botulism reported annually in the United States is associated with home-canned foods that have not been safely processed. Occasionally, though, commercially processed foods are implicated in botulism poisoning, including sausages, beef stew, canned vegetables, and seafood products.

The Nunavik Regional Board of Health and Social Services was informed of suspected cases of Botulism (qassuniq) in Inukjuak, on March 22. An investigation revealed that the cases were associated with igunaq consumed during two feasts on March 18th and March 19th. More than 27 people may have been exposed at the feasts and afterward from food later consumed at home. There may still be contaminated igunaq in the community and in situations like this, the meat from that source should be destroyed. The best way to destroy the contaminated meat would be to burn it. It’s important to identify all the meat from the suspected igunaq and be sure it’s destroyed. Before eating walrus meat, people should verify where it came from and make sure that it’s not from the same source that was given at the feasts.

Botulism (qassuniq) is a severe disease that can lead to death. There is no way of cleaning the contaminated meat and it must be destroyed. People who think they might have symptoms of botulism (qassuniq) should seek medical evaluation at their local CLSC (Nursing Station). Symptoms may include nausea, vomiting, weakness, dry mouth, dyspnea (difficulty breathing), blurred vision and dysphonia/dysarthria (voice or speech disorder).

A few suspected cases of botulism (qassuniq) occur each year in Nunavik. Keeping sea mammal products at a cold temperature (below 4°C) at all times is a preventive measure. Freezing products and waiting for the cooler days of fall is recommended for making igunaq safely.

Clover Leaf Seafoods Corp. is recalling two flavors of boneless sardines because it has been determined that they may permit the growth of Clostridium botulinum, which causes botulism poisoning.

The company triggered the recall, according to a notice posted by the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA). The notice did not provide any details on how the problem was discovered or how the volume of sardines subject to recall.

Government inspectors are working with the company to find the cause of the problem. The investigation could lead to the recall of other products, according to the CFIA notice.

As of the posting of the recall notice no confirmed illnesses had been reported in connection with the recalled sardines.

Consumers ca use the following label information to determine whether they have any of the recalled sardines in their homes.

Brand Product Size UPC Codes
Clover Leaf Sardines Boneless Fillets – Garlic & Chive in Oil 106 g 0 61362 46008 6

0170CBXP 2025 JN 18

0204CBXP 2025 JL 22

Clover Leaf Sardines Boneless Fillets – Smoked Jalapeño in Oil 106 g 0 61362 46009 3

0171CBXP 2025 JN 19

0218CBXP 2025 AU 05

0307CBXS 2025 NO 02

About botulism
While a variety of illnesses can result from eating under-processed food, one of the most dangerous is botulism poisoning. Untreated, botulism can paralyze the muscles needed for breathing, resulting in sudden death.

Anyone who has eaten any recalled products and developed signs of botulism poisoning should immediately seek medical attention, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

“In foodborne botulism, symptoms generally begin 18 to 36 hours after eating contaminated food. However, symptoms can begin as soon as 6 hours after or up to 10 days later,” according to the CDC website.

The symptoms of botulism may include some of all of the following: double vision, blurred vision, drooping eyelids, slurred speech, difficulty swallowing, difficulty breathing, a thick-feeling tongue, dry mouth, and muscle weakness. People with botulism poisoning may not show all of these symptoms at once.

These symptoms result from muscle paralysis caused by the toxin. If untreated, the disease may progress, and symptoms may worsen to cause paralysis of specific muscles, including those used in breathing and those in the arms, legs, and the body from the neck to the pelvis area.

Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment has investigated several cases of confirmed or suspected foodborne botulism in the state since September. Testing from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention confirmed four of the cases, one is still under investigation and test results are pending. All five cases occurred along the Front Range. The individuals are either hospitalized or recovering.

The department investigated the cases in September and October. Three of the cases appear to be unrelated as no common food item was identified. The last two confirmed cases were likely the result of an improperly canned shared food made in the same household.

“Five cases of foodborne botulism in the span of a few months is unusual in Colorado and is cause for concern,” said Nicole Comstock, deputy branch chief, communicable disease branch. “Botulism does not spread from person to person, so there is no risk to the public. However, these cases are a good reminder of how important it is to properly preserve and handle food in the home.”

A variety of foods can be associated with foodborne botulism, including homemade foods that were improperly canned or preserved. The most common source of home-canning related botulism cases come from foods with a low acid content, such as chiles, green beans, potatoes, beets, corn, and asparagus. Prior to these recent cases, the last confirmed cases of foodborne botulism in Colorado occurred in 2019 among a group that consumed a commercially prepared potato product held at improper temperatures.

To prevent botulism, it is important to follow proper canning and food preservation procedures. The Preserve Smart website from Colorado State University Extension provides information regarding considerations for choosing tested preservation methods and the importance of adjusting canning methods for elevation to ensure home-preserved food products are safe to enjoy.

Additional steps people can take to reduce their chances of getting botulism include:

  • Refrigerating homemade oils infused with garlic or herbs and throwing away any unused oils after four days.
  • Keeping potatoes that have been baked while wrapped in aluminum foil hot (at temperatures above 140°F) until they are served, or refrigerating them with the foil loosened.
  • Refrigerating any canned or pickled foods after you open them.
  • Before tasting or serving, boil all home-canned, low-acid vegetables for 10 minutes plus one minute for each 1,000 feet increase in elevation above sea level (e.g. at 5,000 feet, boil for 15 minutes).

Botulism is a rare but serious illness caused by a toxin produced by Clostridium botulinum bacteria. When ingested, the toxin attacks the body’s nerves. Symptoms typically start with muscle weakness in the face and neck, and then spreads to the torso, arms, and legs. The toxin weakens muscles used for breathing which can lead to death. It is important that anyone ill with symptoms of botulism visit a health care provider immediately to be assessed.

The Rhode Island Department of Health (RIDOH) Is advising consumers to avoid juices, smoothies, and sea moss gel purchased from Health is Wealth Nutrition Center located at 1674 Cranston Street in Cranston because of the potential for processing, storage, and control issues with these products. Product images are attached.

The products under investigation include:

– Health is Wealth Sea Moss Drink. This juice is sold in a variety of flavors including but not limited to Blackberry, Fruit Punch, Soursop Guanabana, Strawberry, Passion Fruit, Pineapple, Mango, Guava Guayaba, and Tamarind. These products are sold in 12oz and 16oz containers.

– Health is Wealth Sea Moss Smoothie. This smoothie is sold in a variety of flavors including but not limited to Pina Coloda, Peanut Punch, Soursop/Guanabana, Cinnamon Vanilla, and Mango. These products are sold in 12oz and 16oz containers.

– Health is Wealth Sea Moss Gel. This gel is sold in a variety of flavors including Sea Moss Bladderwrack Aloe Vera Gel, Sea Moss Bladderwrack Gel, and Sea Moss Gel. These products are sold in 16 oz containers.

– Health is Wealth Sea Moss Protein Shakes. These shakes are sold in a variety of flavors including but not limited to Peanut and Cinnamon. These products are sold in 12oz and 16oz containers.

Inadequate processing allows for the survival of the toxin that can cause Botulism. Botulism can cause weakness, dizziness, double vision and trouble speaking, swallowing, or breathing. People experiencing these symptoms should seek medical attention.

These products should be discarded.

No illnesses have been associated with these products.

Primula Ltd. has recalled cheese spread in tubes in the United Kingdom and Ireland because of possible contamination with Clostridium botulinum due to a production fault.

Primula, part of the Kavli Group, recalled 10 varieties after finding one product contained Clostridium botulinum during a routine test and due to concerns other items in the range could be affected.

Manufacturing controls that could potentially affect safety of the products could not be demonstrated satisfactorily by the company, according to the Food Standards Agency (FSA).

The Food Safety Authority of Ireland (FSAI) reported the issue relates to controlling factors to prevent the growth and toxin production by Clostridium botulinum. There’s currently been no reports of illness.

All 150-gram chilled Primula plain original cheese spread, cheese spread with smoked paprika, cheese spread with jalapeno, light cheese spread, cheese spread with ham, cheese spread with chive and cheese spread with prawn with best before dates from Dec. 25, 2020, to Jan. 28, 2021, are affected.

The ambient 100-gram versions of Primula original cheese spread, cheese spread with ham and cheese spread with chives with best before dates Oct. 30, to Dec 10, 2020, are also involved.

Primula Ltd. has recalled cheese spread in tubes in the United Kingdom and Ireland because of possible contamination with Clostridium botulinum due to a production fault.

Primula, part of the Kavli Group, recalled 10 varieties after finding one product contained Clostridium botulinum during a routine test and due to concerns other items in the range could be affected.

Manufacturing controls that could potentially affect safety of the products could not be demonstrated satisfactorily by the company, according to the Food Standards Agency (FSA).

The Food Safety Authority of Ireland (FSAI) reported the issue relates to controlling factors to prevent the growth and toxin production by Clostridium botulinum. There’s currently been no reports of illness.

All 150-gram chilled Primula plain original cheese spread, cheese spread with smoked paprika, cheese spread with jalapeno, light cheese spread, cheese spread with ham, cheese spread with chive and cheese spread with prawn with best before dates from Dec. 25, 2020, to Jan. 28, 2021, are affected.

The ambient 100-gram versions of Primula original cheese spread, cheese spread with ham and cheese spread with chives with best before dates Oct. 30, to Dec 10, 2020, are also involved.